Requirement Collection and Story Gathering

Requirement or story-gathering is a process to engage different types of users (or their representatives) and create personas to collect functional and non-functional requirements and gain a comprehensive understanding of potential interactions with system users.

What is Requirement Collection and Story Gathering

Requirement or story-gathering is a process to engage different types of users (or their representatives) and create personas to collect functional and non-functional requirements and gain a comprehensive understanding of potential interactions with system users. Requirements gathering is an ongoing process that is intended to evolve with the feedback received at each agile iteration. Some of the common techniques for gathering requirements include facilitated story-writing workshops, job shadowing, group creativity techniques, Greenfield technique, agile Prototyping and wireframes, interviews, User role modeling and persona, surveys and questionnaires.

Top related courses to Requirement Collection and Story Gathering

Related methods and techniques to Requirement Collection and Story Gathering

  • Greenfield technique

    1. Greenfield technique

    Greenfield is a technique in which participants use their imagination (without limits or constraints) to think about the product requirements.

  • Story-Writing Workshops

    2. Story-Writing Workshops

    Story-writing workshops (aka. user story workshops) is a preferred technique to collect user stories. The user story writing workshops are attended by qualified cross-functional stakeholders as well as subject matter experts. Participants make up as many user stories as they can by putting themselves in the shoes of the different types of users who interact with the system and the actions each takes to get their job done.

  • Job shadowing

    3. Job shadowing

    Job shadowing technique is the direct observation of how users use or interact with the system or the product and its environment. Job shadowing are helpful to compare the gathered requirements with what real users actually do in real life. This technique is often used to improve the usability of the system.

  • Interviewing

    4. Interviewing

    Interviewing is a technique used for gathering requirements from appropriate stakeholders, such as sponsors, customer proxy, or subject matter experts. The agile team arranges meetings with stakeholders, asks them a series of open-ended questions to determine their needs and desires for the system, and records their responses.

  • Surveys and Questionnaires

    5. Surveys and Questionnaires

    Surveys and questionnaires are a set of questions to answer and an easy technique to get more information about the list of requirements. Unlike interviews, surveys are one-directional questions and not useful to collect new requirements.

  • Wireframes

    6. Wireframes

    Wireframe is a quick and inexpensive tool for verifying that the team's understanding of the proposed system or the features it contains meet stakeholder expectations. Wireframes are a quick mock-up of the product and a quick way to get feedback.

  • Group Decision-Making Styles

    7. Group Decision-Making Styles

    Decision-Making styles in a group are as follows:

    • Authoritarian: The leader makes self-centered decisions and does not consult participants or ask questions. Such decisions follow the command and control style of project execution.
    • Participatory
      • Consultative: The leader actively solicits the opinions and suggestions of the participants, but makes the decisions himself/herself.
      • Consensus: In democratic decision making, all participants provide input, vote, and arrive at a final decision that the group agrees to.
  • User Personas

    8. User Personas

    User personas describe different types of users of the product. Each persona provides a realistic description of a typical user or group of users who behave similarly or have similar expectations of the system.

    The idea behind the Persona is that for software to work effectively, it must be developed for specific people. Unlike actors, personas are not the roles that people play.

    Extraordinary types of users that might interact with the system are called extreme personas.

    A Persona used in the user-story template could look:
    As <persona> ,
    I want <what?>
    so that <why?>.

  • Use Case Diagram

    9. Use Case Diagram

    Use case diagram is a tool for modeling the functionality of a system using actors and use cases. The use case diagram shows how the user will use the system. A use case is a set of actions, services, and functions. Actors are persons or entities that act within a system.