Problem Resolution

Problem solving is a continuous improvement. Agile team members are best suited for problem solving because they do the work and have the most information needed to get to the root cause of the problem and find solutions to it.

What is Problem Resolution

Problem solving is a continuous improvement. Agile team members are best suited for problem solving because they do the work and have the most information needed to get to the root cause of the problem and find solutions to it.

Top related courses to Problem Resolution

Related methods and techniques to Problem Resolution

  • Problem Solving Steps

    1. Problem Solving Steps

    Problem solving consists of five steps:

    1. Identify the problem
    2. Define the problem
    3. Analyze the problem, its root cause, context, and impact.
    4. Identify the solutions to the problem
    5. Implement the best solution
    6. Review and validate that the problem has been solved
  • 5 Why’s Technique

    2. 5 Why’s Technique

    The Five Whys is a technique for identifying the root cause of a problem by asking a series of "why" questions. Teams can find the root cause of a problem by five times going through tailored "why" questions, each related to the answer to the previous "why" question.

  • Fishbone Diagram

    3. Fishbone Diagram

    Fish bone diagram (aka. Ishikawa and cause-and-effect) is a structured brainstorming technique to identify potential underlying factors or causes of a problem and them into useful categories.
    The problem is represented at the head or mouth of the fish and the bones represent different categories of causes, each with a list of possible contributory causes. Team can use the "5 Whys Technique" or keep asking "why" questions to find deeper causes and organize them into relevant categories.

    Typically used categories of a fishbone diagram include materials, measurements, people, time, energy, machinery/infrastructure, and environment.

  • 80-20 Rule and Pareto Diagram

    4. 80-20 Rule and Pareto Diagram

    The 80-20 rule (also known as the Pareto principle) states that 80% of the problems in the system come from 20% of the causes. Alternatively, by eliminating 20% of the system's deficiencies, 80% of the system's problems can be solved. The rule is based on calculating the frequency of incidents that cause most of the problems.
    Pareto charts are often used to present the data and make decisions about corrective actions based on the 80-20 rule.
    Pareto charts represent the type or category of causes ordered by frequency of occurrence.